Ultrasound therapy
EXPLAINED 

Ultrasound therapy obviously has a correlation  to ultrasound: acoustic waves that vibrate at a frequency not audible to the human ear, i.e. 20000 Hertz. Their use in a therapeutic setting is possible because the ultrasound penetrates the biological system and releases a wave. This is precisely why ultrasound therapy is a widely used treatment in physiotherapy; it is a mechanical heat therapy that brings benefits through a high-frequency cellular and intracellular massage action. The sound, in fact, has elastic characteristics that generate an oscillating movement. This vibration produces a series of compressions and rarefactions that spreads in the form of a sound wave. Its propagation speed depends above all on the characteristics and temperature of the body being treated. Therefore, the tissues reached by the ultrasound in turn vibrate, producing heat. This is why ultrasound therapy has an analgesic, antiphlogistic, muscle-decontracting and local metabolism-stimulating therapeutic action.


ULTRASOUND THERAPY IS WIDELY USED IN SPORTS AND PHYSIOTHERAPY TO HELP WITH THE FOLLOWING PROBLEMS:

- Sciatica
- Neuritis
- Periarthritis
- Tendinitis and tendinopathies of various kinds
- Sub-acromial impingement of the shoulder
- Muscle injuries

The use of ultrasound therapy is used exclusively in orthopaedic and some rheumatic conditions, mainly due to the analgesic function of ultrasound.

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